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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
-- recently last week i was in korea and japan doing some business over there to with companies. i did hear over and over again, there's a lot of concern over there about whether or not the folks in washington will be able to get a deal together. because it's unlikely that many of those companies there or here are going to be willing to invest, to hire, to put people to work unless there's some kind of resolution, some kind of clarity looking forward. >> we'll leave it there. good to have you on the program, sir. thanks very much, governor. >> thank you. >> jack markell. >> and this is not a knock on the governor, but did you notice like so many elected officials, they can't bring themselves to publicly say the word, we raised taxes, right? which is what they did and it worked, but we raised revenue. revenue has become the new catch word for taxes. >> right. we are raising stock prices right now. we were down 189. down 107 right now. >> is this decline a preview of what can come next week if we don't see a deal to avoid the cliff? we'll talk about it. >> also, antawn shutz gives us his best
is going to be, fiscal cliff going into the end of the year, we'll start to focus on europe and japan printing money over there. we'll get back into the macroeconomic horizons and see how it goes. but yeah. i think there's been some outflows in certain sectors, risk is on here. >> all right. bill nichols how are you playing this waiting game right now? >> i think one of the real interesting sectors one of the guests mentioned is the action in financials. you look at bank america and you haven't seen any real participation in the financial sector for four or five years. that's one to keep an eye on. you may see a meaningful move. that could be good for the market. >> you don't think it's too late -- >> -- next year in terms of a tax increase. >> bank of america is the best performing this year. it's not too late to get into that? you think there's more to come? >> look at the short-term move and it looks good. look at a five or six year chart and it's a different story. looks like you've got more room on the upside. >> rick santelli, jump in here. what are you seeing in chicago the mov
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in the economy. certainly europe's not any help. what's happening in china and japan is not any help. then you add on top of it what's coming out of washington. i don't think you should get your hopes up about figuring it out before the end of this year. i think there's a pretty deept chance we go over the cliff and then try to sort it out in the beginning of the year. >> lovely. >> joe, when did 146,000 jobs become good? have we become so pessimistic -- have our expectations come so low we're cheering 146,000 when we should be well over 200? >> plus the downward revisions for the previous two months. >> although, those revisions were almost all in government. mandy makes a good point. 150,000 a month, which has been the average over the past is a months or so, is not great. if this was a normal recovery, we'd be growing at 4% instead of 2 on gdp. employment would be well over 250. however, the good news in today's report was if you look at the household survey, there was clearly a hurricane effect in these numbers. we might actually have printed over 200 absent hurricane sandy. i would argue
there. looked at the 1930s and the experiences in japan, we's trying to make sure we have neither of the two outcomes. >> what are the implications of the bond market, rick santelli, now that we have it back? >> i want to go to the other question. i think there's a silver lining to the idea that the chairman talked about the labor force participation rate and shrinkage because now he has a vested interested to differentiate shrinkage in the unemployment rate versus good and bad, meaning whether people disappear or whether they get jobs, and in terms of the markets, you know, we just crossed 170 in the ten-year. most of the traders i'm talking to think that the last several basis points of a higher yield in 10s and 30s has been due to the selloff in equities, and i think the selloff really in large part was, i don't know about you, but, you know, his press conference was highly detailed, highly quantitative but nobody on the floor really understood a word of it. it made them nervous. >> i always think about that fed news conferences, all the guys in high school with pocket protecto
get china exposure. europe, japan and the u.s. are all up 12% to 15% for the year. china's down
have been very strong. china has been strong. mandy, you know, japan has been strong, and the banks have been strong. to me there's an underlying strength to the market when some of the bodyguards have been doing well so i think the market wants to do better. that having been said the fiscal cliff will turn out to be not a maxi deal but a mini deal and will clip the economy not by 1% but a 2% and a 60% chance something will get done but that's where we come out on it right now. a little bit harder hit to the economy. >> don't adjust your sets, everybody. this is what bob sounds like today. >> this is a different exchange here. >> not doing your imitation of david? >> what do you think that the seasonal factors are a major reason why the markets are holding up so well? if you look at the havens, gold, treasuries, for example, the dollar, there's no sign of panic in the haven. >> silver is down. you've seen a little bit of a lift in the vix, closer to 20. that's not bad, a normalization type of thing. treasuries have sold off a little bit. that means the patient is leaving the hospita
-old. we know central banks committed. we know avi in japan will raise, we know germany is a big economy. i would pay close attention to cross trades like the euro/yen. i don't think you need to answer the fiscal cliff issues. foreign exchange is a better place to be, even with the manipulation of central banks. >> ed, jump in here in terms of areas that you want to avoid. where do you think the areas of this market are that really get hit the hardest on the fiscal cliff the lack of fiscal cliff deal. >> absolutely. and maria, i think it is important to underscore one fact. no matter what the resolution is on the fiscal cliff, it is not going to help the balance sheet of this country. and the balance sheet of the world economy is in such disarray that the only way we solve this is by growth and all of the economies, not by taxing and not going about it the way the government is talking about it. the far and away, the number one place it avoid are long-term interest rates sensitive bonds in the united states. if there was ever an investment more obvious to avoid, i don't know what it is. sta
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)